ABOUT

Chris Blevins didn’t want the clock to run out on his music career. He was working at a post office in his hometown of Henryetta, OK, writing songs and performing at small venues on the side, but his hobby started to pick up. He started driving to Tulsa to gig at night after long work days and formed a backing band to help develop his original material. However, working full-time didn’t leave much room to progress as a musician. After Blevins considered recording his bluesy folk-rock sound, he knew he’d have to choose between his job or his music. “Something had to give one way or the other, and I made up my mind that it was not going to be music,” Blevins said. “I made up my mind that I was not going to give up on it.” He remembers the exact date — Dec. 19, 2016 — that he left the post office and became a full-time musician. From that day on, he channeled his blue-collar roots out of the workplace and into a debut album, “Better Than Alone,” which dropped Aug. 18, 2017 via Horton Records.

ABOUT THE ALBUM

Recorded at Little Rock’s Fellowship Hall Sound studio with an all-star cast of Oklahoma musicians, Chris Blevins’ debut album, Better Than Alone, is an impressive collection of ten beautifully crafted songs that range from heartbreaking tales of love and regret to wry political commentary. With a backing band that includes some of the State’s best and brightest – artful musical chameleon Chris Combs, badass bassist Aaron Boehler, dynamic drummer Andrew Bones, and Grammy-award nominee John Fullbright, just to name a few – this freshman effort easily stands on its own and is a sure sign of more great things to come from this talented singer songwriter.

Much like his home state, Blevins’ music is a crossroads, a wicked blend of Southern rock & country crooning, seasoned with a shuffle and maybe even a hint of small town Gospel. This talented lyricist writes with a folk singer’s clear-eyed view of the world around him coupled with a romantic’s sense of longing and regret. From the astute and catchy chorus of “Big Man”: “They’ve got a brand new way to wear the same old sin,” to the haunting lines of “Wildfire”: “Tell me what you came for, so I know how you’ll leave. Will you carry me home at sunrise, or will you bury me?” Blevins’ proves equally Wadillepiat mat s Ccloemverplay nsiesumm, Inacri. zing the state of the nation as he is at channeling love and loss with an authentic, fresh and powerful voice.

Recommended if you like: Hayes Carll, Steve Earle, John Fullbright

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